One factor that makes interaction between multi-ethnic groups of women difficult and sometimes impossible is our failure to recognize that a behaviour pattern in one culture may be unacceptable in another, that is may have different signification cross-culturally … I have learned the importance of learning what we called one another’s cultural codes.
An Asian American student of Japanese heritage explained her reluctance to participate in feminist organizations by calling attention to the tendency among feminist activists to speak rapidly without pause, to be quick on the uptake, always ready with a response. She had been raised to pause and think before speaking, to consider the impact of one’s words, a characteristic that she felt was particularly true of Asian Americans. She expressed feelings of inadequacy on the various occasions she was present in feminist groups. In our class, we learned to allow pauses and appreciate them. By sharing this cultural code, we created an atmosphere in the classroom that allowed for different communication patterns.
This particular class was peopled primarily by black women. Several white women students complained that the atmosphere was “too hostile.” They cited the noise level and direct confrontations that took place in the room prior to class as an example of this hostility. Our response was to explain that what they perceived as hostility and aggression, we considered playful teasing and affectionate expressions of our pleasure at being together. Our tendency to talk loudly we saw as a consequence of being in a room with many people speaking, as well as of cultural background: many of us were raised in families where individuals speak loudly. In their upbringings as white, middle-class females, the complaining students had been taught to identify loud and direct speech with anger. We explained that we did not identify loud or blunt speech in this way, and encourage them to switch codes, to think of it as an affirming gesture. Once they switched codes, they not only began to have a more creative, joyful experience in the class, but they also learned that silence and quiet speech can in some cultures indicate hostility and aggression. By learning one another’s cultural codes and respecting our differences, we felt a sense of community, of Sisterhood. Representing diversity does not mean uniformity or sameness.

Bell Hooks, Feminist Theory: From Margin to Center (pages 57-58)

(Source: ceedling)

herrfalter:

The Art Assignment 3. Intimate, Indispensable GIF
I’m a programmer. Were I a painter, the keyboard would be my brush and paint. The keyboard is being assembled in the order of what I think to be the most important to me and my profession.
You can click here for a larger (15 MB) version. To learn more about The Art Assignment go here: theartassignment

herrfalter:

The Art Assignment 3. Intimate, Indispensable GIF

I’m a programmer. Were I a painter, the keyboard would be my brush and paint. The keyboard is being assembled in the order of what I think to be the most important to me and my profession.

You can click here for a larger (15 MB) version. To learn more about The Art Assignment go here: theartassignment

hodge-podgery:

cuntravoid:

malformalady:

 An old tree stump with grass growing over it, Faroe Islands

are you stupid thats a unicorn

oh what I have to draw this

I love this unicorn

hodge-podgery:

cuntravoid:

malformalady:

An old tree stump with grass growing over it, Faroe Islands

are you stupid thats a unicorn

oh what I have to draw this

I love this unicorn

Worksheeting to try to figure out timelines and plot lines and how to make this dang novel work in the rewrite. #writing #novelling

Worksheeting to try to figure out timelines and plot lines and how to make this dang novel work in the rewrite. #writing #novelling

"I received a letter from a girl and I’d like to share just a small part of it with you: “Dear Lupita,” it reads, “I think you’re really lucky to be this Black but yet this successful in Hollywood overnight. I was just about to buy Dencia’s Whitenicious cream to lighten my skin when you appeared on the world map and saved me.”


My heart bled a little when I read those words, I could never have guessed that my first job out of school would be so powerful in and of itself and that it would propel me to be such an image of hope in the same way that the women of “The Color Purple” were to me.


I remember a time when I too felt unbeautiful. I put on the TV and only saw pale skin, I got teased and taunted about my night-shaded skin. And my one prayer to God, the miracle worker, was that I would wake up lighter-skinned. The morning would come and I would be so excited about seeing my new skin that I would refuse to look down at myself until I was in front of a mirror because I wanted to see my fair face first. And every day I experienced the same disappointment of being just as dark as I was the day before.”

This is from a beautiful speech by Lupita Nyong’o, star of “12 Years A Slave,” about Black beauty, which she read at the ESSENCE 2014 Black Women In Hollywood luncheon. Read the full speech here on The Frisky! (via thefrisky)